• JSAS

Covid-19 and Beyond: A Webinar Connecting Japan and South Africa

Updated: 5 days ago

This webinar is over. Thank you very much for the global participation!

We organize a Japan/South Africa joint webinar on Covid-19 on the 4th of July, Saturday, starting at 11 am (South Africa time) = 6 pm (Japan time), inviting distinguished guest speakers from both Africa and Asia.

Please download a flyer with basic information.

Covid and Beyond Japan South Africapdf



The conference page is here

Registration is very simple. Please click here


Concept

The COVID-19 global pandemic has had a severe impact on all aspects of society, changing daily life, limiting local transport and international mobility, disrupting work and the functioning of the economy and exacerbating poverty and social inequality. Many believe that the COVID-19 recession is probably the deepest since the Second World War and has affected most countries since the long depression of the 1870s. Despite this consensus, cooperative responses at the global level have been weak, while the domestic response in the industrialized world has been timely and substantial. Examples include the European Union with the European Solidarity and Japan, which has somewhat succeeded in containing the pandemic without massive lockdown or mass testing like in China and South Korea. There is thus increasing concern that the impact of the COVID-19 will be more significant than anticipated in developing countries, especially in Africa, because of the low capacity to tackle both health and economic crisis. Most of the African countries are still fighting the first wave of virus, and at the time of this writing, there has been a rapid rise in the daily number of confirmed cases while the number of tests to cases is low. The pressure to reopen the economies to limit the economic damage could spark the second wave of the virus, as it is ongoing in China. As the crisis unfolds, it is crucial to take stock of current challenges and responses and to reflect on new directions for global development post-COVID-19.

On Saturday, July 4, the Center for Japanese Studies (CJS) at the University of Pretoria, in collaboration with the Japan Society for Afrasian Studies will host a webinar discussing how ongoing initiatives can help mitigate the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, either in the immediate coping phase or when economies start to recover. The event is supported by the Graduate School of International Development, Nagoya University, and the Institute for Future Initiatives, The University of Tokyo.

The event will feature framing remarks by Vick Ssali, President of the Japan Society for Afrasian Studies and lecturer at Aichi Gakuin University, followed by a panel discussion.

Panel discussants include Christian Otchia of Nagoya University, Scarlett Cornelissen of the University of Stellenbosch, Ayako Takemi of the University of Tokyo, Sithembile Mbete of the University of Pretoria, and Masaki Inaba of the Africa Japan Forum. The discussion will be moderated by Rangarirai Muchetu of Doshisha University.

Conference Date: July 4, Saturday, 2020

Conference Venue: Zoom.

Registration required: https://bit.ly/37Jc3tU

Inquiries: Inquiries about this online event should be directed to:

Christian Otchia, Graduate School of International Development, Nagoya University

E-mail: otchia@gsid.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Agenda

11:00 (SAST), 18:00 (JST): Framing remarks

Vick Ssali

President, Japan Society for Afrasian Studies; Lecturer, Aichi Gakuin University

11:10 (SAST), 18:10 (JST): Roundtable discussion

Christian Otchia

Associate Professor, Graduate School of International Development, Nagoya University

Scarlett Cornelissen

Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Stellenbosch

Ayako Takemi

Project Member, Institute for Future Initiatives, the University of Tokyo

Sithembile Mbete

Lecturer, Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria

Masaki Inaba

Director of Global Health Programme, Africa Japan Forum

12:00 (SAST), 19:00 (JST): Q&A session


Closing remarks

Keiko Arai

Centre for Japanese Studies, University of Pretoria




© 2019 Japan Society for Afrasian Studies